Thrawn Novel by Timothy Zahn

Did anyone else notice Ahsoka in the Thrawn novel besides me?

The great thing about having an extensive media universe is the ability the hide Easter eggs. Who doesn’t get excited seeing Rapunzel in Frozen? Or Lou Ferrigno as the security guard in The Incredible Hulk? Or the Binford Tools tool box in Toy Story?

Star Wars does it, too. The Ghost and member’s of its crew made a few appearances in Rogue One. We saw E.T.’s in the Senate in Revenge of the Sith. Finn found the remote Luke used to practice his light sabers skills on the Millennium Falcon in The Force Awakens.

Knowing that artists like to hide things in their work, it stands to reason that Timothy Zahn would be no different. This is especially true in Thrawn because the main character is known for paying very special attention and noticing what others overlook. So innocuous details which pass by very quickly could very well hold interesting significance.

Case in point, in the novel, Thrawn rescues the crew of the Dromedar. When he first sees them, they are locked in a cell. There are ten of them. Seven humans, Two Gran, and one Togruta.

To paraphrase Matt Damon from The Martian, I’m about to Thrawn the stuffin’ out of this.

It is interesting that there is only one species that is singular in the crew; Togruta. This makes this unnamed character stand out.

“Okay,” you say, “Togruta come in two different genders. Do we even know if this Togruta is male or female?” The passage states, “her cone-horn montrals and striped head-tails [make] her prominent among the prisoners.” At the very least, we have the right gender.

Skeptics may think that all we’ve done so far is take the population of Togruta in the galaxy, a number probably in the billions, and divided it by two. The odds are still against this being Ahsoka.

There are only two more sentences in the book about this woman, and they are written to indicate they are the thoughts of Thrawn as he sizes her up.

The Togruta watches as the new prisoners approach, her hands rubbing slowly vertically along one of the bars of their prison. She looks briefly at each of the Imperials, the turns her attention to Angel.” Angel is the pirate who keeps the key to the cell around his neck.

Which phrase seems a little strange? Let me ask you this, if you were writing or filming a scene in which a character was locked behind bars, how would you stage that character? I imagine it two ways. One way is to have the character leaning forward, resting on a horizontal bar. and dangling her hands through two separate gaps between vertical bars. The second choice is to have the character standing up straight and gripping two different vertical bars. Two hands on one vertical bar seems an unnatural to me.

Why is this stance even mentioned? What makes it noteworthy to Thrawn? It could symbolize something. Maybe the Togruta is thinking of another object she is familiar with and wishes she had in this situation.

What kinds of linear objects do people hold vertically with both hands? A baseball bat? A flagpole? A rope?

A lightsaber.

I know she is famous for her having two sabers in a reverse grip, but she has been known to wield a single saber with both hands.

Two hands holding a linear object vertically.

So what does a Force wielder trained by the Jedi do while being held prisoner? She bides her time, waiting for her opportunity to escape. She looks at the Imperial prisoners briefly as they are brought to the cell. She doesn’t trust Imperials because of how she was treated during the Clone War,s and then there was the implementation of Order 66. She may think that using the Force to escape could cause her unwanted attention from the Empire, or she may wonder if she should enlist their aid in escaping.

Her attention to the Imperials is brief. Angel gets her full attention. He is, at that moment, the source of danger and the means of escape. Ahsoka, um, I mean the unnamed Togruta knows neutralizing Angel and stealing the key from him are the two most important objectives.

So, does anyone else see Ahsoka in the Thrawn novel besides me? Hey, Janine Spendlove or anyone else reading this that knows Mr. Zahn, would you mind asking him for me?